spindleshanking:

muirin007:

I love the idea of Erik and Christine snuggling. It’s completely loaded with fluff, but I think both of them deserve a respite from all the high melodrama. For the record, this is completely G-rated cuddling.…….Okay, maybe PG because there was definitely some smooching involved. But that is it, kids, no Phantom hanky-panky here. Also, I wanted to try drawing Erik wearing his false nose. Many false noses of the day were attached to glasses or had straps that wrapped around the face in order to attach them to the nasal cavity, which I don’t think would fly with Erik. I imagine he would have sculpted his own false nose and used some sort of putty to blend it with his skin tone and attach it to his face. What, exactly, I’m not sure, but he’s a genius, so I’m sure he came up with something that looked natural enough. That being said, I still wanted the “seam” to be visible because this is 1881, after all, and  although Erik’s a genius, he doesn’t exactly have access to modern facial prosthetics. Originally, I drew him with his mask on, but I thought it would be incredibly uncomfortable for both of them if he attempted to fall asleep wearing it (can you imagine it digging into Christine’s chest? OUCH), so I came up with a little back story that involves him removing the mask but still opting to wear the false nose because he doesn’t want to completely gross Christine out. She, for the record, couldn’t care less, but he sees it as the gentlemanly thing to do. A gentleman, after all, doesn’t wipe his gaping nasal cavity all over his lady’s bosom.……….This went from romantic and fluffy to exceptionally disgusting.Phantom of the Opera belongs to Gaston Leroux.

I’ve spent far too much time imagining how Erik’s prosthetics would work.
Period-wise, he would certainly either sculpt his own nose or find somebody else who could do it for him as it requires a huge amount of artistic talent for it to look natural and realistic, probably more then than it does now. Then he would most likely glue it into place, just around the edges of the nasal cavity, probably using spirit gum or something similar. The moustache is indispensable for public appearances as it’s fashionable as much as it is to draw the eye away from any obvious imperfections in the attachment of the nose.
Modern-wise, if Erik were seriously into the fake nose idea and it was a rule rather than exception, he would most likely have a metal plate adhered to his skull with a magnet in the nose, so the nose can easily pop on and off without any difficulty or glue. And I easily see him sticking his nose collection on the fridge for safe-keeping and just to be cheeky. (Then hiding them somewhere else when Christine comes to visit because maybe that’s a little too creepy.)
Both modern and period-wise, I headcanon him having multiple noses of different shapes he can swap out as he pleases, based on his mood and needs.
I have an obsession with Erik and prosthetics, don’t look at me.

spindleshanking:

muirin007:

I love the idea of Erik and Christine snuggling. It’s completely loaded with fluff, but I think both of them deserve a respite from all the high melodrama. 

For the record, this is completely G-rated cuddling.

…….Okay, maybe PG because there was definitely some smooching involved. But that is it, kids, no Phantom hanky-panky here. 

Also, I wanted to try drawing Erik wearing his false nose. Many false noses of the day were attached to glasses or had straps that wrapped around the face in order to attach them to the nasal cavity, which I don’t think would fly with Erik. I imagine he would have sculpted his own false nose and used some sort of putty to blend it with his skin tone and attach it to his face. What, exactly, I’m not sure, but he’s a genius, so I’m sure he came up with something that looked natural enough. That being said, I still wanted the “seam” to be visible because this is 1881, after all, and  although Erik’s a genius, he doesn’t exactly have access to modern facial prosthetics. 

Originally, I drew him with his mask on, but I thought it would be incredibly uncomfortable for both of them if he attempted to fall asleep wearing it (can you imagine it digging into Christine’s chest? OUCH), so I came up with a little back story that involves him removing the mask but still opting to wear the false nose because he doesn’t want to completely gross Christine out. She, for the record, couldn’t care less, but he sees it as the gentlemanly thing to do. A gentleman, after all, doesn’t wipe his gaping nasal cavity all over his lady’s bosom.

……….This went from romantic and fluffy to exceptionally disgusting.

Phantom of the Opera belongs to Gaston Leroux.

I’ve spent far too much time imagining how Erik’s prosthetics would work.

Period-wise, he would certainly either sculpt his own nose or find somebody else who could do it for him as it requires a huge amount of artistic talent for it to look natural and realistic, probably more then than it does now. Then he would most likely glue it into place, just around the edges of the nasal cavity, probably using spirit gum or something similar. The moustache is indispensable for public appearances as it’s fashionable as much as it is to draw the eye away from any obvious imperfections in the attachment of the nose.

Modern-wise, if Erik were seriously into the fake nose idea and it was a rule rather than exception, he would most likely have a metal plate adhered to his skull with a magnet in the nose, so the nose can easily pop on and off without any difficulty or glue. And I easily see him sticking his nose collection on the fridge for safe-keeping and just to be cheeky. (Then hiding them somewhere else when Christine comes to visit because maybe that’s a little too creepy.)

Both modern and period-wise, I headcanon him having multiple noses of different shapes he can swap out as he pleases, based on his mood and needs.

I have an obsession with Erik and prosthetics, don’t look at me.

(via littlelottie)

operafantomet:

Four random Palais Garnier photos:

1. The grand staircase, in the 1870s or 1880s.
2. The chandelier in making. The proportions aren’t quite right, but it’s still recognizable.
3. Part of the subterranean lake, used to balance the ground. If I’ve understood it correctly it varies how flooded the various rooms are down there.
4. Charles Garnier, architect of the Parisian opera which soon enough got the nickname “Palais Garnier” - the Garnier Palace.

castelnou:

l’opera garnier (paris, france)

castelnou:

l’opera garnier (paris, france)

jcllib:

Opéra Garnier, Paris, France.

www.jcllib.tumblr.com

jcllib:

Opéra Garnier, Paris, France.

www.jcllib.tumblr.com

stepoutintotheworld:

Plan of the Opera - Follow for more!

stepoutintotheworld:

Plan of the Opera - Follow for more!

chescaleigh:

Ever wonder what it’s like to be an actor or actress of color? This perfectly sums it up.

(via ninjagiry)

Backstage

Backstage

asker

Anonymous asked: Gaston Leroux= anagram for Illuminati. Duh.

Yeah I don’t see it

asker

Anonymous asked: Um, I'm not sure why you're tagging Tennant as 11. It's either a mistake or a hilarious coincidence. (I'm sleepy, I'd be amused by a ball of fluff, don't mind me).

Mhmm typing error
I reposted it

Watching the best show #davidtennant #doctorwho #10 #tv

Watching the best show #davidtennant #doctorwho #10 #tv